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Tuesday, April 7, 2020 | 12:00pm - 1:00pm | Join Us! | https://zoom.us/j/806977623 No pre-registration needed - just click the link and join live. 

Join us for our series of weekly lunch-and-learns to hear children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors share their inspirational stories of hope, luck, resilience, and rescue. 

Naomi Newman - The daughter of two survivors, Naomi tells the stories of her parents from primary source documents and historical records. 

Naomi calls her story, “Resilience: My Family Story.”  She gathered all the documents and pictures she could find, consulted with relatives, and researched many details of this story.  Her hope, as one of the Holocaust Center’s Legacy Speakers, is to reach young people and help them to understand the way our lives can be threatened, and what each one of us can do to make a difference.

 

Lunch-and-Learns will be offered at the same time every Tuesday in April! A separate link will be sent out for each event. 

Tuesday, April 14 | 12:00-1:00 | Breeze Dahlberg
Graddaughter of Hungarian Auschwitz survivor Vera Frank Federman, Breeze shares her grandmother's story. 

Tuesday, April 21 - Yom Hashoah: Holocaust Remembrance Day | 12:00-1:00 | Special Memorial Program with Survivor George Elbaum
George was born in Warsaw, Poland on August 20, 1938, one year before Hitler invaded Poland. 

Tuesday, April 28 | 12:00-1:00 | Betsy Touriel-Kapner 

 

PAST PROGRAMS 

March 31, 2020 - You can watch the past Lunch-and-Learn presentation with Arik Cohen, grandson of four Holocaust survivors,  HERE.  

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Monday, April 6, 2020 | 11am - 12pm | 1 Clock Hour | Free | Register Now!

Are you looking for ways to teach the Holocaust online or remotely? Continue to engage and challenge your students, whether at home or online.  Materials will encourage students to consider the impact of their choices, the difference one person can make, and the importance of standing up for one another. Paul Regelbrugge, Professional Development and Curriculum Coordinator will present and share ideas for teachers (and parents). 

The meeting will take place on Zoom. You do not need to have a Zoom account to join the webinar. When you register, you will receive a link to use.

 

 

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Student Book Club | April 23 | 11am-12pm | The Yellow Star House with author Paul Regelbrugge

Author, teacher, and Holocaust educator Paul Regelbrugge will read from his book, The Yellow Star House, and engage students in discussion. The Yellow Star House recounts the remarkable true story of one boy's survival in a protected house in Hungary.

Paul Regelbrugge, a teacher in Spokane, WA at the time, asked Holocaust survivor Robert Holczer to come and speak to his 6th grade class. His students were enthralled by the unique story of Robert and the motivations of his rescuer. Paul and Robert became friends over the last decade of Robert's life and Paul became one of the few people trusted to record Robert's story. 

From these stories and interviews comes Paul's first book, and one of the first books on this inspirational story of the rescue of 400 Jews in the middle of Budapest, Hungary.

 

JOIN THE STUDENT BOOK CLUB!

 

What do students in the book club do? 

Students in the book club will read the book The Yellow Star House and join in a conversation with Paul on April 23 from 11am-12pm via Zoom. (You do not need to have a Zoom account to join the conversation. We will send you a link to use.)  This is a chance for students to connect with each other, talk about the story, and discuss inspiring people and stories.

How do I get the book The Yellow Star House?

The Yellow Star House can be purchased on Amazon (kindle or print), or at lulu.com (paperback or ebook). You can also This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to request a free downloadable pdf copy.

How old do you need to be to participate?

This book is recommended for grades 7 and up.

When and where does the book club meet?

This is a virtual book club, so students from anywhere can participate. The first meeting is on April 23, 11am-12pm. We will send out a link on Zoom that you use to join the meeting. 

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | 12:00pm - 1:00pm | Link coming soon! No pre-registration needed - just click the link and join live!

In commemoration of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) join us for a special online program highlighting themes of resilience, hope, determination, and generosity of spirit.  Guest speakers include Holocaust survivor George Elbaum, Rabbi Daniel Wiener of Temple De Hirsch Sinai, and Dee Simon, Baral Family Executive Director of the Holocaust Center for Humanity. 

George Elbaum was born in Warsaw, Poland on August 20, 1938. George's mother, acutely aware of the danger she and her son were in, purchased the identification documents of a Catholic woman who had died. In 1942, she smuggled George out of the Warsaw ghetto and paid various Polish Catholic families to hide and raise him.

Rabbi Daniel Wiener is the senior rabbi at Temple De Hirsch Sinai, one of the largest reform congregations in the Pacific Northwest. He is passionate about social justice and collaboration between religions and religious leaders. 

Yom Hashoah, or Holocaust Remembrance Day, commemorates the 6 million Jews and millions of others who were killed in the Holocaust. The date is set in accordance with the Hebrew calendar, on the 27th of Nisan, so that it varies in regard to the Gregorian calendar. The date was chosen to mark the beginning of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.  

Thank you to our Community Partners:

Temple De Hirsch Sinai | UW Hillel | Mishelanu

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Yom Hashoah: Holocaust Remembrance Day - April 21, 2020. 75 Years After Liberation. 

Yom Hashoah, or Holocaust Remembrance Day, commemorates the 6 million Jews and millions of others who were killed in the Holocaust. The date is set in accordance with the Hebrew calendar, on the 27th of Nisan, so that it varies in regard to the Gregorian calendar. The date was chosen to mark the beginning of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.  

In light of growing concerns and restrictions related to the spread of COVID-19, we encourage you to find new and different ways to commemorate Yom Hashoah this year. 

1. Virtual Community Holocaust Remembrance Day Program

Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | Holocaust Center for Humanity | 12pm - 1pm | Details

In commemoration of Holocaust Remembrance Day, join us for a special program with survivor George Elbaum. 

More...

2. Student ActivityHolocaust Writing, Art, and Film Contest. Have students work together or individually to create a piece to submit the contest.

3. Discussion & Activity: Pyramid of Hate. Where can we find examples of each level historically? Where can we find examples of each level today?

4. Reading/Activity: Poems from "I Never Saw Another Butterfly" and optional activities. Poem "Each of Us Has a Name" by Zelda.

5. Film: "With My Own Eyes" - Film provides an overview of the Holocaust, connecting this history with our world today.

6. Short Films: Pigeon and Porcelain Unicorn - short films that lend themselves to discussion

7. Social Media: Show you remember - Print out #ChangeBeginsWithMe, take a photo and post to social media

8. Host a  Virtual Book Club: Suggested books for book clubs include All But My Life, Night, or try the graphic novel Maus. There are many more! Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for recommendations. 

9. Reading/Student Activity: The Ethics of War: Jewish Partisans – An activity for students (recommended grade 8 and up) – includes a dramatic reading (with 8 characters) to challenge participants on how we make ethical choices. (Jewish Partisans Educational Foundation)

10. Names readingList of 5000 victims of the Holocaust

11. Survivor Stories – Read survivor stories and watch clips of their testimonies on the Survivor Encyclopedia: Washington State. 

12. Reading/Activity: Acknowledge the heroic efforts of rescuers recognized as Righteous Among the Nations 

 

International Holocaust Remembrance Day | January 27

January 27 was designated as International Holocaust Remembrance Day by the United Nations General Assembly in 2005. It marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau. Every year, the Holocaust Center for Humanity holds a community program to mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

 

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Tuesday, June 30, 2020 | 9:00 - 3:30pm | At the Holocaust Center for Humanity  | Registration Required. 

6 clock hours and lunch provided. $25 Registration fee. 

For teachers new to the subject and teachers looking for new ideas and support to effectively teach about the Holocaust. Geared to teachers of grades 5-12. Other educators and administrators are welcome to attend. 

"I was overhwhelmed by the idea of teaching the Holocaust. This workshop gave me ideas and materials that I can take right into my classroom." - Teacher, Kitsap Peninsula

Sessions include:

  • Holocaust legislation in Washington State and what it means for you in 2020-2021
  • Teaching with artifacts
  • Tour of the Holocaust Center's exhibit, "Finding Light in the Darkness"
  • Using stories and testimony from local Holocaust survivors
  • Sample lessons for the classroom
  • Special guest speaker who will share family experiences from the Holocaust

 

REGISTER NOW

 

Questions? Email Ilana - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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RESCHEDULED! Fact, Opinion, & Propaganda: Empowering Students to be Reliably Informed | Teacher Workshop | October 29, 2020 | 9:00am - 3:30pm | At the Henry and Sandra Friedman Holocaust Center for Humanity  

Lunch provided. 6 Clock Hours. Registration Fee - $25. 

REGISTER NOW

 

Participants will: 

  • be able to differentiate types of misinformation
  • understand how misinformation is created and spreads
  • apply digital forensics and fact-checking tools and skills to verify information and debunk misinformation
  • connect news literacy to civic engagement and recognizing the standards of quality journalism
  • explore current trends in misinformation and conspiracy theories relating to Holocaust denial

Presented by John Silva, NBCT Director of Education for the News Literacy Project.

Funding for this program was made possible, in part, due to a grant from the Tillie and Alfred Shemanski Testamentary Trust.

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RESCHEDULED! Fact, Opinion, and Propaganda: What does it mean to be news-literate? | Public Program | Thursday, October 29 | 6:30 - 8:30pm 

With special guest speaker, John Silva, Director of Education, News Literacy Project. At the Holocaust Center for Humanity. Registration required. $10. 

Participate in a lively discussion about what anyone can do to be more critical about how they engage with news and information. Topics to be discussed include:

  • Propaganda and the Holocaust - with educator and presenter Branda Anderson
  • What does it mean to be news-literate? 10 skills to be reliably informed - with guest speaker John Silva

REGISTER NOW

 

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"I believe very strongly this is the most hopeful place in the city." - Local Holocaust Survivor Steve Adler

Finding Light in the Darkness - Through stories and artifacts of Washington State Holocaust survivors, the museum’s exhibit engages visitors in this history and challenges them to consider how each person’s actions make a difference.

Visitors to the Holocaust Center can take a Virtual Reality tour of the Anne Frank annex, interact with embedded testimony screens that feature survivors and stories of coming to Seattle, explore artifacts that bring history to life, and learn about local students who are upstanders in their schools and communities.   

TICKETS

 

Open Wednesdays and Sundays | 10am - 4pm

Group Tours & Field Trips by appointment every day except Saturday

At the Henry and Sandra Friedman Holocaust Center for Humanity | 2045 2nd Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121 

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At the entrance to the Holocaust Center for Humanity are photos of children who experienced the Holocaust. All are survivors who later moved to the Seattle region, with the exception of one. Come visit and learn more about the stories. Photo by Alan Berner, Seattle Times staff photographer. 

 

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A bookcase opens to reveal a photograph of the stairs leading to Anne Frank's hiding place in Amsterdam during the Nazi occupation. Explore this feature and learn more about Anne Frank when you visit the Holocaust Center. Photo by Alan Berner, Seattle Times staff photographer. 

 

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A memorial to the 6 million Jewish people murdered in the Holocaust and the millions of other victims invites visitors to leave notes, prayers and wishes at the Holocaust Center. Photo by Alan Berner, Seattle Times staff photographer. 

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Train tracks at the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp in Poland at the Holocaust Center for Humanity. Designed by architects Olson Kundig. Photo by Stefanie Felix. 

This exhibit was supported, in part, by 4Culture/King County Lodging Tax and The State of Washington.