A Global Journey to Safety with Holocaust Survivor Henry HaasA Global Journey to Safety with Holocaust Survivor Henry Haas

Tuesday, March 2 | 12-1pm (PT) 

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Henry Haas’ story of survival echoes that of thousands of Jewish families trying to escape from Nazi-occupied territories. With few options, the Haas family’s arduous journey out of Berlin lasted a year, leading a nomadic existence until finally escaping to Shanghai, China—the only port that would accept them.

A city of 6 million at that time, the Haas family arrived in Shanghai without funds, in a temperature of 105 degrees Fahrenheit, and encountered an entirely foreign culture
and now under Japanese occupation.

Two years after the end of WWII, the family arrived as non-English speaking refugees in San Francisco. The Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), helped the Haas family come to America, where they finally settled in Tacoma, Washington.

Henry’s wife, Kate, has documented the Haas family story in great detail. Together, Henry and Kate, with the use of photos, maps, and historic family documents, tell the story. Henry and his late mother Gerda, who lived to age 98, told this story for many years to school classes and other groups in the Tacoma area. Henry is part of the Holocaust Center for Humanity’s Speakers Bureau to further share his memoir of antisemitism during the Holocaust.

Thank you to our community partners on this week's program: 

Temple Beth El 

 

The Crime of Complicity: Law and the BystanderCLE compl header 450x275
from the Holocaust to Today

Tuesday, March 9, 2021 | CLE & Public Program

12:00 to 1:00 pm PT | Open to all | Zoom 

1 Washington State Bar CLE Credit | Flyer

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Speaker Amos N. Guiora, Professor of Law at the S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah

Join the Holocaust Center for Humanity and legal professionals from around Washington for a special legal CLE program and Lunch-and-Learn on Tuesday, March 9 on the Crime of Complicity: Law and the Bystander from the Holocaust to Today with Professor Amos N. Guiora. 

In addressing the bystander from the perspective of a crime of omission, one of the most important questions is whether we are examining a legal or ethical dilemma. Professor Amos Guiora proposes that the most appropriate lens is that of a strict legal examination. Others suggest this is an ethical dilemma rather than a legal dilemma. In his lecture, Professor Guiora will address this conflict by presenting the competing tensions between law and ethics.

Professor Guiora has an A.B. in history from Kenyon College, a J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law, and a Ph.D from Leiden University. He has published extensively both in the United States and Europe on issues related to national security, limits of interrogation, religion and terrorism, the limits of power, multiculturalism, and human rights. 

Thank you to our Sponsor:

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Thanks to our Community Sponsors:

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America and the Holocaust series: Part One of Three

Presented by The Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program at Pacific Lutheran University

Burying the Holocaust in the Pages of The New York Times
with Professor Laurel Leff

Tuesday, March 16 | 12-1pm (PT)

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During World War II, The New York Times published over 1,800 detailed, timely stories about what was happening to Europe's Jews, almost all of which appeared inside the newspaper. Northeastern University Journalism Professor Laurel Leff will discuss why The Times decided to bury the story of the extermination of the Jews and how that fateful decision affected contemporary understandings of the cataclysmic event. 

Laurel Leff is Professor of Journalism and Associate Director of Jewish Studies at Northeastern University in Boston. Her book, Buried by The Times: The Holocaust and America’s Most Important Newspaper, was chosen as the Best Media History Book of 2005 by The American Journalism Historians’ Association and Best History Book of 2005 by ForeWord Reviews. 

Thank you to our community partners on this week's program: 

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America and the Holocaust series: Part Two of Three3 23 LL

Presented by The Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program at Pacific Lutheran University

Tuesday, March 23 | 12-1pm (PT)

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“I saw one [Jewish] man,” wrote American journalist, Varina Fry in a 1935 New York Times article, “brutally kicked and spat upon as he lay on the sidewalk, a woman bleeding, a man whose head was covered with blood, hysterical women crying…Nowhere did the police seem to make any effort whatever to save the victims from this brutality.”

Fry’s experiences as a journalist covering Germany under Hitler’s rule provoked him into action, creating the Emergency Rescue Committee, a private America relief organization, with the goal of rescuing endangered intellectuals in France. Author Sheila Isenberg uses Fry’s own words and the testimony of refugees and compatriots to vividly paint the tense atmosphere of wartime Marseille, where desperate refugees found precarious asylum.

Isenberg describes the inventive measures Fry took to save more than 2,000 people, far more than the 200 intellectuals, scientists, writers, and artists he had originally been assigned to aid. Convening a network of people to assist him, Fry was able to arrange escapes from internment camps, forge documents, and bribe officials to spirit away to safety people threatened by the Nazis. In 1994, his efforts were recognized as he became the first American to be honored by Yad Vashem as "Righteous Among the Nations."

Isenberg is the author of several books including A Hero of Our Own: How one American in Marseille saved Marc Chagall, Max Ernst, Andre Breton, Hannah Arendt, and a thousand others from the Nazis – The Story of Varian Fry; Muriel’s War: An American Heiress in the Nazi Resistance; and Women Who Love Men Who Kill.

Thank you to our community partners on this week's program:  

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UPCOMING LUNCH-AND-LEARN PROGRAMS:

12:00 - 1:00pm (Pacific Time) Every Tuesday.  Join us for our weekly Lunch-and-Learn series to hear children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors, notable speakers on timely issues, and historical experts. 

These programs aim to present perspectives and voices that challenge and inspire people to confront bigotry, racism, and indifference, and to consider how their actions make a difference. 

Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed in these programs are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of the Holocaust Center for Humanity and its employees.   

 

SEE PAST PROGRAMS!

 

Thank you to our 2021 Lunch-and-Learn Sponsors:

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The Frances Roth & Stanley R. Schill Foundation    

 

Thank you to the grantors, companies, and individuals who have made this year's Lunch-and-Learn series possible. If you or your company are interested in sponsoring one or more Lunch-and-Learns throughout the year, please contact Nicole Bela: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

CLE compl header 450x275The Crime of Complicity: Law and the Bystander from the Holocaust to Today

Tuesday, March 9, 2021 | CLE & Public Program

12:00 to 1:00 pm PT | Open to all | Zoom 

1 Washington State Bar CLE Credit | Flyer

Register Now

 

Speaker Amos N. Guiora, Professor of Law at the S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah

Join the Holocaust Center for Humanity and legal professionals from around Washington for a special legal CLE program and Lunch-and-Learn on Tuesday, March 9 on the Crime of Complicity: Law and the Bystander from the Holocaust to Today with Professor Amos N. Guiora. 

In addressing the bystander from the perspective of a crime of omission, one of the most important questions is whether we are examining a legal or ethical dilemma. Professor Amos Guiora proposes that the most appropriate lens is that of a strict legal examination. Others suggest this is an ethical dilemma rather than a legal dilemma. In his lecture, Professor Guiora will address this conflict by presenting the competing tensions between law and ethics.

Professor Guiora has an A.B. in history from Kenyon College, a J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law, and a Ph.D from Leiden University. He has published extensively both in the United States and Europe on issues related to national security, limits of interrogation, religion and terrorism, the limits of power, multiculturalism, and human rights. 

Thank you to our Sponsor:

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Thank you to our Community Partners:

Civil Rights World PeaceCardozo 20Logo 20Sign bw 209CGFLogoKarr Tuttle Campbell

Non Jewish Victims 3 35 21.2TEACHER WORKSHOP 

Thursday, March 25 | 3:30-5:30pm (PT) | Zoom

2 Clock Hours | Flyer

With Dr. William Meinecke, of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

The Nazi regime persecuted different groups of people based on their antisemitic and racial ideology. Jews were the primary targets for systematic persecution, but Nazi policies also led to the brutalization and persecution of millions of others including the Roma and Sinti (Gypsies), people with mental and physical disabilities, those of African descent, Poles, gay men, and Jehovah’s Witnesses.

In this workshop, teachers will explore Nazi ideology and how and why Nazi policy singled out these groups and how the racist belief system became encoded into law.

Dr. William Frederick Meinecke Jr. joined the staff of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C. in 1992. He was on the original design team of the Museum's Wexner Center’s multi-media program on the Holocaust, the Historical Atlas of the Holocaust, and the Student Learning website. In June 2000, Dr. Meinecke joined the staff of the Museum’s Education Division. His book, Nazi Ideology and the Holocaust, was published by the Museum in December, 2007. For the last 10 years, Dr. Meinecke has shared his expertise in numerous venues in the U.S. and abroad and has specialized in Holocaust seminars working with law enforcement officers, judges, prosecutors, and attorneys on the subject of “Holocaust History and The Law.”

 

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The EdgeXperience - A 5-Day Virtual for Young Professionals
with IsraelEdge2 at Heart

Presented by the Israeli American Council

February 22-26, 2021 • Virtual

Be a part of our community of young professionals, ages 22-42, who are passionate about Israel and seek extraordinary networking opportunities and professional development.

CLICK HERE for more information and to register